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Friday, November 15, 2019

Sfardie Posek Mocks Chassidish Havarah in Davening ....



HaGaon HaRav Bentzion Mutzafi Shlita, a prominent sephardi posek in Eretz Yisrael mocks ashkenazi chassidim and their style of Davening. 
The Rav made his remarks during a weekly shiur.

Even though he speaks in Hebrew ... you can understand what he is getting at ..

9 comments:

No Couscous for me said...

Then I get to mock the havorah of the Moroccans, the Syrians, the Iranians, etc, because the only country where the Yidden still pronounce words exactly as it was in the Beis Hamikdash is Yemen.

There is a discussion in poskim about deviations from original pronounciation which was caused by different factors. We are not required to go back to the original.

There is a takonna for bnei Ashkenaz that was made 700 years ago that we do have stick to the original nigunei tefillah however and be mevatel any new ones that pop up. So our niggunim are certainly more original than ALL of the Sefardim & Edut Mizrach combined.

galicianer said...

How would he pronounce PUTZ in sfaradit?

Joe Magdeburger said...

We should learn from each other, but we should be careful. When followers of a posek echo his words, much gets lost in translation. People take a rav's words, or his facial expressions and use them as an excuse to engage in schoolyard bullying. I like the orderliness and decorum of mizrachi kenesiot, but I'm not going to sell Ashkenazim or chassidim short either. Now that we are together in our own country at close quarters, let's learn from each other and respect each other.

jancsibacsi said...

HaGaon HaRav Bentzion Does not desreve the title of hagaon or harav he is a first class putz for mocking the way chassidim daven, he has the mentality of an immature child theese sefardim who never went through any hardships like the ashmenazin have the audacity to behave in this way shame on them or on this rav the fool he is a shote

Zako said...

To: No Couscous

You say: "the only country where the Yidden still pronounce words exactly as it was in the Beis Hamikdash is Yemen."

You probably meant "the country where the Yidden's pronounciation is the closest one (and not "exactly like") to the Beis Hamikdosh times is Yemen", because this pronounciation surely has suffered some alterations over the centuries, just like everywhere else.

Anonymous said...

He was not mocking the pronunciation of the words. He was not making anyone personally. He was describing the poor quality of davening in shtiebels where every word is swallowed and all you hear is kaddish. The fact is that most davenings in shtiebels are a bizayon hatfilah and that was his point. The thing is that shtiebels are found by chasidim so it can sound as if hes mocking specifically them. Sefarim don't have shtiebels rather they have real shuls. But if sfardim were to daven with poor quality then he was talking about them as well.

Anonymous said...

Watching this is heart breaking. We are in Golus, with so many suffering in so many ways.... yet here we have a Torah leader making fun of a large community that has had to rebuild itself from the horrors of the Churbon. We need achdus, not cheap jibes.

Stoliner said...

No one will have any problem hearing if you scream the davening like one of us!

Or if you pretend you are Belsky screaming at a boy molested by his friend Kolko to terrify him into silence. You could even hear Belsky's blood curdling screams in outer space despite that hearing in space is otherwise scientifically impossible.

Yehuda said...

Historically, Halakha was in widespread use as an enforceable body of civil law. During the Age of Enlightenment, more Jews began assimilating into secular European society, and halakha became less central to Jewish life. Today, observance of Halakha is defined by denomination; Reform Jews generally do not follow it, Conservative Jews follow only part of it, Orthodox Jews observe the religious law strictly but modify other portions of it to suit modern life, while the most conservative communities like Lubavitchers and Haredim (the so-called "ultra-Orthodox") consider all of their respective flavors of Halakha as binding for all aspects of life. Some Orthodox communities in the United States have even established "modesty patrols" in their neighborhoods, which are creepily reminiscent of mutaween in some Islamic states.

Parts of Israeli family and marriage law are governed by religious communities, which means halakhic family law applies to all Jews (religious or not) wishing to contract or dissolve a marriage in Israel.

Like Sharia, Halakha has some interesting suggestions for dealing with women, homosexuals, and other minorities.